UAE media project for children announces partnership with UN World Food Programme for refugees in Jordan

 

Jawaher bint Abdullah Al Qasimi,

Jawaher bint Abdullah Al Qasimi

 

Sharjah, UAE, 22th May 2016

Jawaher AlQasimi, The Director of Sharjah International Children’s Festival (SICFF) and the FUNN (Sharjah Media Art for Youth & Children), announced during the 69th Cannes Film Festival that SICFF has partnered with the United Nations World Food Programme (WFP) to support school feeding activities for Syrian refugees in Jordan’s Zaatari Camp. The camp, just 10 kilometers south of the Syrian border, is Jordan’s first official camp for Syrian refugees fleeing violence in their country.  

UAE delegates to Cannes Festival

UAE delegates to Cannes Festival

 

According to Jawaher AlQasimi, SICFF will support and ensure education to underprivileged children and promote interest in media arts through WFP’s school feeding programme.

“As an organisation [primarily] committed to supporting both the advancement of Sharjah-based filmmaking and encouraging the art form among younger generations, we feel that by supporting children from backgrounds of extreme circumstance and living conditions we can – in some small way – contribute towards creating a better future,” Jawaher AlQasimi said.

The food distribution activities will commence in July of this year, with SICFF also set to screen several films from Sharjah International Children’s Film Festival 2015 – for the entertainment of the families and children living in the camp.

“Partnering with SICFF will add value to our school-meals projects that benefit millions of children worldwide every year. We appreciate the continued support of the UAE Government and look forward to working with SICFF to help children as school is the foundation for future generations to grow and thrive,’’ said Abdallah Alwardat, Director of World Food Programme Office in GCC Countries.

“WFP’s school feeding project in Zaatari camp is one of our attempts to restore some normalcy into the lives of refugees and especially children whose lives have been drastically affected by the conflict,” Al Wardat added.

 

Share this post Share on FacebookShare on Google+Tweet about this on TwitterShare on LinkedInEmail this to someone

Related posts

Do you wear an apron or a cape? Indian women can help you to chose

Do you wear an apron or a cape? Indian women can help you to chose

Arab women, especially in the Gulf region, do not know much about Indian women except the disadvantaged poor ones who were forced to work in their homes under hellish conditions. I admire Indian women, especially many smart ones I met during my work and travels, too many that I can't...

TRADITIONAL PALESTINIAN WEDDING

TRADITIONAL PALESTINIAN WEDDING

Photos by: Ahmad Daghlas The Heritage Week Festival in Birzeit is unique among festivals in the breadth and diversity of the exhibits, productions, articles and activities. street performances, theater for adults and for children, and dancing and music – much, much music, from jazz to...

Syrian-American Mona Haydar Raps about Hijab

Syrian-American Mona Haydar Raps about Hijab

A poet from Flint, Michigan, who posted her music rap video on Facebook this week about wrapping and wearing a hijab has seen her song go viral. The song, “Hijabi,” written and performed by 28-year-old Syrian-American Mona Haydar is catchy and fun, an ethos the video, produced and directed...

Leave a comment